National Geographic

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Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.
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National Geographic

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Photo by @FransLanting I’m sharing this image of a Kakapo, one of the world’s rarest birds, in celebration of @NatGeo’s “Year of the Bird” campaign for 2018. When New Zealand broke away as a sliver of Gondwanaland many millions of years ago, it became an evolutionary raft of birds, which evolved there in wondrous ways. A parrot with Australian ancestors turned into a flightless vegetarian that roams the forest on foot after dark in search of seeds. Kakapos are the heaviest parrots in the world and they are nocturnal. They are highly endangered today and most of them now live on only three islands off New Zealand, where invading rats can’t get to them. One memorable rainy evening I caught up with a Kakapo. Actually it caught up with me. A curious female came to check me out as I was lying flat on my stomach on the muddy forest floor, camera in one hand, strobe in the other. Follow me @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more images from the world of birds. @natgeocreative @thephotosociety New Zealand Kakapo YearoftheBird Endangered Parrot Birdphotography

1 Hours ago
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Photo by @mishkusk (Michaela Skovranova) Coral reefs are one of the most diverse ecosystems on earth -  they provide critical habitat to a host of marine life, from fish to invertebrates. The 2017 coral spawning event - a mass reproduction event where many colonies of coral simultaneously release egg and sperm bundles for fertilisation was a significant time of year for conservation scientists. A nature event that usually happens only once a year it is during this time coral eggs and sperm can be collected to be studied and artificially grown in labs. Scientists from the Australian Institute of Marine Science plan to study the coral cells collected during the spawning event to see how or if corals are adapting to warmer waters. There is some early indication that some corals are more resilient to warming than previously thought, giving some hope to conservationists. Full story is available online with words by Sarah Gibbens coralreef greatbarrierreef nature underwater ocean climatechange coralspawning australia

3 Hours ago
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Photograph by @juanarre (Juan Arredondo) In February 2000, when members of a paramilitary group massacred townspeople in El Salado, one victim was Miguel Ángel Contreras. His father, Jesús Contreras, has not visited El Salado since. Now 86, blind, and deaf, he lives with his daughter in Cartagena. The killing of El Salado lasted six days from February 16 to 21 of 2000. By the end, 66 people were killed and the remaining 4,000 residents fled, joining more than 2 million other internally displaced Colombians at the time. After 52 years of internal conflict, this hopeful nation seek a lasting peace and new opportunities. Shot on assignment this month's issue of @natgeo 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. To see more about Colombia or to learn more about the changes that are taking place. Follow me @juanarre on Instagram colombia peaceprocess internallydisplacedpersons almaguillermoprieto postconflict photooftheday everedaylatinamerica

6 Hours ago
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Photo by @ronandonovan // Captured withgalaxy S8, produced with @samsungmobileusa // A montane side-striped chameleon in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. Chameleons have evolved with independently moving eyes, which give them the ability to scan their surroundings 360 degrees for potential prey or predators.

7 Hours ago
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Photo @lucalocatelliphoto for @natgeo two kids on a mountain of 6,000 tons of potatoes grown on their family’s ultra-productive farm. The Van den Borne potato farm yields twice the global average of other potato growers and it is considered an example of the so-called precision agriculture, where drones and other tools assess the health of individual plants and determine exactly how much water and nutrients they need to thrive. Today the farm is the largest producer of potatoes in the country, and the Netherlands is one of the leading exporters of potatoes in the world. Follow me @lucalocatelliphoto to see more about the future of farming agriculture potatoes farming hunger netherlands

8 Hours ago
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Photo by @williamodaniels for @natgeo. Bangladesh, Dhaka. Sanjida Sahajahan, 11, was a healthy toddler when the common bacterium pneumococcus devastated her brain. When I met her last year, she couldn’t talk, couldn't walk and couldn’t eat alone. She wasn’t vaccinated for pneumonia because developing countries didn’t have the PCV vaccine when she was a kid. It is only in 2015 that Bangladesh started to use the PCV vaccines. This picture was published as part of the story « Why vaccines matter » in the Novembre issue of tte magazine.

10 Hours ago
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Photo by @pedromcbride (Pete McBride) // Canyons of Light: Exploring these halls of humanity from above. To see more follow @pedromcbride // newyork aerial perspective empirestatebuilding light nyc

13 Hours ago
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15 Hours ago
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Photograph by @simonnorfolkstudio Monitoring solar activity to defend us against devastating particle storms … The European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT) at Ramfjordmoen, near Tromsø in northern Norway operates radar systems to study the interaction between the sun and Earth as revealed by disturbances in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The system has also been tested for space debris tracking of low-Earth-orbit debris down to 2cm in size. Here photographed, the MORRO radar - an MST (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) radar used to study atmospheric phenomena such as those associated with polar mesospheric echoes. The radar system employs a 12x12 array of antennas and is operated by the Department of Physics and Technology of the University of Tromsø. Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material. @simonnorfolkstudio @natgeo photojournalism documentaryphotography simonnorfolk EISCAT northernlights norge norgesfoto radar Tromsø environmentalscience bbcearth environmentalist ionosphere aurora auroraborealis radiowaves scientificstudy atmosphere Ramfjordmoen norway arcticnorway xfiles Tromso spacedebris troposphere magnetosphere universityoftromso image: @simonnorfolkstudio words: @tribaleye

17 Hours ago
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Photo by @paleyphoto (Matthieu Paley). An expedition member takes a sand bath in the fascinating Lut Desert, Iran. NASA’s satellites from 2003 to 2010 testify that the hottest land surface temperature on Earth is located in this desert. The surface of its sand has been recently measured at 78.2 °C (172.8°F), the highest ever recorded. This image was shot in spring, when, on this day, the surface temperature “only" hovered around 55 C (131 F). This desert host flora and incredibly adaptable fauna such as lizards and foxes, which scientists are currently studying. For more cultural encounters, please visit @paleyphoto iran desert sandbath

20 Hours ago
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Photo by @renan_ozturk Words by @gatherfilm director @mrsanjayr - “As a trained chef, I thought that cooking was everything. But now that I have a son and 2 daughters I realized that I’m a father and a husband first.” - Chef @nephi_craig (White Mountain Apache), along with his wife @Janditawn and baby Tawny (pictured) and daughter Kaia and son Ari. Chef Craig traveled the world, working in some of the most storied kitchens only to come back to where he was born and raised - on the White Mountain / Fort Apache Indian Reservation in what is now Eastern Arizona. The Apache were amongst the last peoples that succumbed to the United States’ genocide against the Indigenous. They’re known primarily (and perhaps erroneously) for their ferocity in the face of annihilation. But they were master foragers and environmentalists first and foremost. They travelled the great deserts and mountains according to the cycle of flora. After the wars against the United States, however, the Apache were forced onto Reservations, partly to separate this great People from their food system. As a result the Apache are amongst the most impacted - health-wise - from a forced diet of low quality commodity foods. But along with a coterie of Apache food sovereignty activists like farmer Clayton Harvey ( @apachefarmer), Nephi is fighting to change that. He is focused on reconnecting his people with their ancient foods and the sense of community those food-ways inspire. “My people are everything to me. And I will do everything I can to help us become strong again." ~ With @taylorfreesolo @shaandiin @sterlinharjo @fndi303 @jenbuffett @the11thhourproject @tanya_meillier

22 Hours ago
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Photo by Maggie Steber @maggiesteber. After Martin Luther King Day, I'm posting a photograph from Haiti, a Caribbean nation which suffered hurtful rhetoric last week on top of the 8th anniversary of the horrific earthquake claiming the lives of over 350,000 in 2010. African nations were also targets of insults. A Haitian woman shields herself from the rain in Cap-Haitien on Haiti's northern coast. The colors of the Haitian flag are blue and red. It is a flag born from revolution. Haitians have figured large in American history. Chicago was founded by a Haitian named Jean Baptiste du Sable who was the first resident and is considered the father of Chicago. Nearly 500 Haitians fought alongside American patriots in the 1779 Siege of Savannah, battling against the British in the American revolution. Their own revolution against their French slave masters resulted in the only successful slave revolt in history that led to the establishment of the first Black Republic in the world. "We Haitians are not victims but victors! The constant narrative of the poor sucks on our self-esteem. The greatest gift Haiti gave to the world was freedom, with the only successful slave revolt against French slave masters and Napoleon's armies that created our country. And she has paid a tax on that gift since then...a poverty tax. No one tells that story." The words of Carl Juste @cjmiamiherald a Haitian photographer living in Miami, Florida who photographs and is actively engaged in the Haitian community. Ti peyi, gran pep is a Haitian Creole saying for small country, grand people. Every nation has glory to its history. 🇭🇹 @fotokonbit @leicawomen @natgeocreative standwithhaiti haiti freedom viiphoto leicawomen ngmwomenogvision tintype

1 Days ago
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Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). The son of kite maker Noor Agha flies a kite in their yard on the edge of Kabul (which is also a graveyard). Every Friday on Nadir Khan Hill hundreds gather to fly and fight these kites, and chase those that fall. To make the kites “fighting kites,” the strings are often coated in glass and glue to cut the competitor's string in mid air. Another role in this game is "kite running," which seems almost as important as kite fighting. Once a kite is cut, the Kite Runner chases after the fallen kite and tries to run it down to retrieve it. See more images of the Maker of Kabul by following @argonautphoto.

1 Days ago
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Photo by @williamalbertallard While working on an essay about Mahatma Gandhi I photographed this group of women learning to spin. Gandhi was so well known for his love of spinning thread and this became an image I sought out while pursuing to document his life. followme @williamalbertallard for more images from India and other assignments spanning five decades. india spinning gandhi

1 Days ago
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Photo by @jimmy_chin @conrad_anker shuttling a load of climbing gear, food and supplies from basecamp to the base of Ulvetanna to attempt a new route on the mountain. To see more images from the edge of the earth and The North Face climbing expedition to Antarctica, follow along at @jimmy_chin. tnfantarctica17

1 Days ago
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Photo by Jeff Kerby // @jtkerby // A Cape starling perches on an Acacia tree near the bank of the bone-dry Kuiseb River in Namibia. Sandwiched between the world’s oldest desert and a vast gravel plain, this is one of many bird species found along this dry riverbed. Water sits below the surface of the sand here, creating a linear oasis that sustains hardy vegetation along the river course that are able to tap into this sinking resource. These underground stores of water recharge when rains fall upstream and flood towards the coast, though sometimes it is years in between events. Competition between humans and plants for this limited supply of water is ever increasing, even in places like this where its life-sustaining stores are hidden even from the eyes of this beautiful bird. For more environment stories from Namibia and elsewhere follow me @jtkerby // Namibia YearOfTheBird NatGeo

1 Days ago
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Video by @joelsartore | Introducing Fabian, a male bearded vulture living in @ParcoNaturaViva with his mate, Julia. They are both 12 years old and met for the first time in 2006. Although it took a while, Fabian and Julia eventually developed a strong bond, and now are mates and build nests together. Bearded vultures are extremely large: they can weigh up to 7 kg and have a wingspan of 231 to 283 cm. They can be found in mountainous regions, between 300 and 4,500 meters above sea level, in desolate areas containing precipices, gorges or cliffs overlooking pastures and meadows. Bearded vultures are known to perform 'sky dances', ascending to high altitudes and rapidly diving down, twisting and rolling past the nesting site. Because bearded vultures feed on the bones of already dead sheep and goats, they were condemned by ranchers and almost completely wiped out by the beginning of the 20th century. Now, thanks to tireless captive breeding and reintroduction programs, the bearded vulture is finally making a comeback! Parco Natura Viva is supporting the Vulture Conservation Foundation for the reintroduction of the bearded vulture in the Alps, as well as participating with scientific papers and developing educational activities with the public to raise awareness on the protection of this magnificent bird. This photo shoot was made possible in collaboration with the @greenteenteam. Check out @joelsartore for a portrait of this vulture!

1 Days ago
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Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto from the @natgeo feature “In the footsteps of Gandhi”. Solidarity in the workplace spills over to the village well in Rasnol, Gujarat. It is one of thousands of places where the Self-Employed Women’s Association (SEWA), a Gandhian trade union, has taken root. Its founder, Ela Bhatt, calls her female clients “the pillars of village society.” SEWA focuses on enterprise development and income generation activities for women. For more human interest stories follow: @renaeffendiphoto @natgeocreative @thephotosociety india women village enterprise water dailylife gandhi

1 Days ago
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Photos by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto which explore the role and function of toys in the lives of children around the world. The photographs reflect the impact of the children’s backgrounds and families on their chiose of toys and highlight the universality of play /// List of countries: 1- Zanzibar, Tanzania. 2- China. 3- Haiti. 4- Mexico. 5- Malawi. 6- Latvia /// For more photos follow me @gabrielegalimbertiphoto toys toystories child children kids play playing family families

1 Days ago
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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - In one way or another we are all explorers, following our personal journey through life and answering questions along the way. Pictured here, an Italian explorer descends into a moulin (a cave in the ice) on the Aletsch glacier in Switzerland. Late in the evening when the temperature is much colder and prevents meltwater cascading down inside the cave, this explorer rappels into another world inside the ice. A world that can help glaciologists better understand how and why these beautiful glaciers melt.

1 Days ago